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Perun

In Slavic mythology, Perun (Cyrillic: Перýн) is the highest god of the pantheon and the god of sky, thunder, lightning, storms, rain, law, war, fertility and oak trees. His other attributes were fire, mountains, wind, iris, eagle, firmament (in Indo-European languages, this was joined with the notion of the sky of stone), horses and carts, weapons (hammer, axe (Axe of Perun), and arrow), and war. He was first associated with weapons made of stone and later with those of metal.

Of all historic records describing Slavic gods, those mentioning Perun are the most numerous. As early as the 6th century, he was mentioned in De Bello Gothico, a historical source written by the Eastern Roman historian Procopius. A short note describing beliefs of a certain South Slavic tribe states they acknowledge that one god, creator of lightning, is the only lord of all: to him do they sacrifice an ox and all sacrificial animals. While the name of the god is not mentioned here explicitly, 20th century research has established beyond doubt that the god of thunder and lightning in Slavic mythology is Perun. To this day the word perun in a number of Slavic languages means “thunder,” or “lightning bolt”.

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Lada

Lada is a goddess in Baltic and Slavic mythology associated with beauty and fertility. Her masculine counterpart is called Lado. Lada and Lado are sometimes seen as divine twins, and at other times as a mother goddess and her son. They are commonly mentioned together in songs related to planting, harvesting, and weddings. Together, Lada and Lado form one aspect of a multiple deity, whose other names and aspects relate to the Sun, water, and grain, respectively.

Worship of Lada and Lado is attested in Russia between the fifteenth and eighteenth centuries during springtime fertility rites, as well as in Polish church prohibitions on pagan rituals. Some scholars have suggested that Lada and Lado are not the names of deities, but simple refrains in songs and poetry. However, a number of songs and historical chronicles provide evidence for a cult of worship.

The origins of Lada in mythology are uncertain; she may derive from other Slavic or Baltic goddesses, or from the Greek Leto or Leda. The names Lada and Lado may be related to the Russian word lad, ‘harmony, peace, union’.

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The asteroid (2832) Lada is named after the goddess.

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Baba Yaga

In Slavic folklore, Baba Yaga (Bulgarian: Баба Яга, romanized: Baba Yaga; Russian: Ба́ба-Яга́) is a supernatural being (or a trio of sisters of the same name) who appears as a deformed or ferocious-looking old woman. In Russian folklore, Baba Yaga flies around in a mortar, wields a pestle, and dwells deep in the forest in a hut usually described as standing on chicken legs.

Baba Yaga may help or hinder those that encounter her or seek her out. She may play a maternal role and has associations with forest wildlife. According to Vladimir Propp’s folktale morphology, Baba Yaga commonly appears as either a donor, villain, or may be altogether ambiguous. Her depictions vary greatly across tales, ranging from a child-eating monster, to helping a protagonist find his missing bride.

Andreas Johns identifies Baba Yaga as “one of the most memorable and distinctive figures in eastern European folklore”, and observes that she is “enigmatic” and often exhibits “striking ambiguity”. Johns summarizes Baba Yaga as “a many-faceted figure, capable of inspiring researchers to see her as a Cloud, Moon, Death, Winter, Snake, Bird, Pelican or Earth Goddess, totemic matriarchal ancestress, female initiator, phallic mother, or archetypal image”.

Baba Yaga in modern day interpretation such as online multiplayer game Smite.